• Publication date: January 14, 2010

What Goes Up, Must Come Down A Hollywood Divorcee Struggles To Live The Glamorous Life

�The Starter Wife� (2008) began as a five-part miniseries in 2007. After a warm reception its studio, the USA Network, began filming a full-fledged television spin-off. 10 episodes were requested which, by and large, continued where the miniseries left off; some might even say that season one of the program is, in actuality, its second season.

�The Starter Wife� (2008) began as a five-part miniseries in 2007. After a warm reception its studio, the USA Network, began filming a full-fledged television spin-off. 10 episodes were requested which, by and large, continued where the miniseries left off; some might even say that season one of the program is, in actuality, its second season.

Fans of the popular �Sex In The City� (1998-2004) television series are also likely to enjoy �The Starter Wife� and indeed many parallels can be drawn between both programs. While �Sex In The City� revolved around the lives of four single women in New York, �The Starter Wife� follows a pair of divorcees accustomed to the glamour and glitz of Hollywood.

However that is where similarities between the two end and uniqueness begins. The program�s title, �The Starter Wife� is a reference to stars� tendency to marry each other for publicity rather than love. Upon reaching middle age its lead character, Molly Kagan (Debra Messing) ends her marriage with hubbie Kenny Kagan (David Alan Basche), realizing that she was merely one step on his ladder to fame.

Single, but refusing to consider dating, Molly remains accustomed to her plush Hollywood lifestyle that was formally funded by Kenny. She struggles to maintain her glamorous image even after discovering her ex-husband, a former Hollywood bigwig, lost prominence in the industry and subsequently his hefty earnings, an income-based percentage of which goes to Molly�s alimony.

Now devoid of a free ride Molly is pushed back into the workforce, attempting to utilize her skill as a writer. However her job prospects are few and her expenses (necessary or not) are many. She swallows her pride and signs up for a writing class, but despite her vow to never date again, Molly unwillingly falls for class instructor and fellow divorcee Zach McNeal (Hart Bochner). With Zach�s help she unearths her knack for observational writing and begins working on a project that seems destined for success. Unfortunately some most unwelcome, premature publicity ferociously destroys her plans.

Molly is joined by a colorful cast of friends including her closest, Joan McAllister (Judy Davis), a recovering alcoholic. Gay pal and clothing designer Rodney Evans (Chris Diamantopoulos) is also in the mix, partaking in a relationship with a closeted and prominent African-American action hero named Felix Jones (James Black). In the midst of all this craziness Molly still manages to spend time with her seven-year-old daughter, Jaden (Brielle Barbusca) who believes mommy and daddy can still patch things up.

Sporadic fantasy sequences referencing popular contemporary and classic films occur throughout each episode, humorously tying into the week�s plot. Each episode is an hour long.