• Publication date: July 14, 2010

Nothing Is What It Seems When It Comes To Winning, Everything Is Fair Game

Emmy and Golden Globe awarded actress Glenn Close, alongside former �Cheers� (1982-1993) cast member Ted Danson star in �Damages� (2007-present). Close gained public attention from her role in 1987�s romance-thriller �Fatal Attraction,� where she depicted an obsessive, psychotic stalker

Emmy and Golden Globe awarded actress Glenn Close, alongside former �Cheers� (1982-1993) cast member Ted Danson star in �Damages� (2007-present). Close gained public attention from her role in 1987�s romance-thriller �Fatal Attraction,� where she depicted an obsessive, psychotic stalker. The intensity Close displayed in �Fatal Attraction� is mirrored in �Damages,� where she portrays cutthroat, high-stakes corporate attorney Patty Hewes.

Danson, most widely known for his comedic roles in television sitcoms, draws from more serious past endeavors, such as 1979�s �The Onion Field� in his depiction of Arthur Frobisher, a corrupt CEO reminiscent of Enron�s Kenneth Lay. His nemesis is none other than Hewes, who is determined to expose Frobisher for insider trading and false profit reports, both factors that cost the CEO�s former employees their life savings.

Both Close and Danson spent a significant amount of time researching their characters, adding yet another level of realism. Close began her research by accompanying many high profile female lawyers throughout New York, while Danson studied the Enron scandal with fervor, in addition to meeting with numerous Fortune 500 executives.

The amount of praise �Damages� has received is exceptional for its genre. The series has not only been well received by critics, but awarded an Emmy and Golden Globe, not to mention another 27 wins and nominations.

Season one begins by introducing viewers to rookie lawyer Ellen Parsons (Rose Byrne). Though professionally inexperienced her education and overall performance has landed her numerous interviews at various prestigious law firms. One firm particularly mesmerizes her however: Hewes and Associates, headed by New York�s infamous Patty Hewes. Yet as the season progresses both viewers and Parsons will discover that Hewes, though somewhat concerned with ethics, eventually has no problem putting them aside for what she perceives as greater good.

Time in �Damages� is not linear. The fate of certain characters and situations are often alluded to in past episodes; this means that missing a week or two can hinder one�s full understanding of the series. That is not a bad thing and it illustrates the creators� dedication to quality, rather than quickly thrown together scripts and premises. In fact, season one begins six months into the future where we meet a bloodied, half-naked Ellen who appears to have just committed murder. No explanation is given, but the fact should be mentally noted for future use.

�Damages� has spawned a total of three seasons since its debut with no immediate end in sight. Do not get lost in the program�s unconventional sense of time and be sure to catch its first season while it�s still fresh.