• Publication date: August 13, 2009

Booth And Bones Are Back Another Season Of Forensic Crime Fighting

�Bones� follows in the tradition of many crime dramas before it such as CSI and the supernatural X-Files. Like the X-Files, �Bones� relies on a dark humor and the chemistry of a male and female partner to add suspense. In fact, what separates the program from others like it is the wonderful chemistry between Bones (Emily Deschanel) and Booth (David Boreanaz).

�Bones� follows in the tradition of many crime dramas before it such as CSI and the supernatural X-Files. Like the X-Files, �Bones� relies on a dark humor and the chemistry of a male and female partner to add suspense. In fact, what separates the program from others like it is the wonderful chemistry between Bones (Emily Deschanel) and Booth (David Boreanaz).

Additionally, show producer and forensic anthropologist Kathy Reichs adds a layer of realism to each week�s story that other programs may lack. Reichs is not only an expert in forensic science with a proven track record, but also an author of numerous novels who understands the importance of suspense. The idiom, �truth is often stranger than fiction� is undoubtedly applicable to Reichs� personal experiences in law enforcement, which in turn keeps viewers� eyes glued to the screen for each episode.

Dr. Temperance "Bones" Brennan is the central character of each episode whose life, in some ways resembles Reichs�. Like the show producer, Bones is a renowned forensic anthropologist and novelist. However despite her talents she struggles with basic social skills, a shortcoming that may hinder her personal relationships, but enhances her critical thinking. Brennan�s constant seriousness is countered by the casual, easygoing attitude of her less scientifically astute partner, Seeley Booth. Bones and Booth are both employed by the FBI and work at the fictional Jeffersonian Institute located in Washington, D.C (which is most likely a reference to the Smithsonian Institute). Primarily, Bones assists Booth in cases where bodies are unidentifiable; with her extraordinary forensic skills Brennan is generally able to match a name to what little remains may be left.

A new cast member joins this season, Camille Saroyan (Tamara Taylor), a Bronx native and former coroner. Tension exists between Camille and Bones, specifically due to the newcomer�s status as a superior over Dr. Brennan. Prior to joining the Jeffersonian staff, Dr. Saroyan was in a romantic relationship with Booth, a fact that will become more problematic later on.

Season two continues in the tradition of its highly successful predecessor and its viewership in the United States rose from a respectable 8.9 million to 9.4 million; it would later attract an audience of 9.6 million. Amongst all of the forensic dramas flooding the market, �Bones� is apparently doing something right and it was nominated for two Teen Choice Awards. Its soundtrack features the likes of Sinead O'Connor, Sarah McLachlan, Crystal Method, and more.

Tune into season two as Bones and Booth attempt to identify the remains of a boy left in a garbage can wearing only a shroud and solve a case involving a man dissolved in a bathtub of lye. Brennan finds herself buried alive in a futuristic grave and Zack finally earns his Ph.D.

�Bones� is rated TV-14 and recommended for viewers 14 and older.