• Publication date: July 10, 2010

Unraveling the Mysteries of the Mind A Hospital Drama with a Neurological Twist

Following the theme as hospital dramas such as �House� and �Grey�s Anatomy�, �3 Lbs� gives the genre a slightly new twist, focusing not on general medical conditions but on neurosurgery. The program�s name is a reference to the human brain, which by most estimates weighs approximately 3 Lbs pounds.

Following the theme as hospital dramas such as �House� and �Grey�s Anatomy�, �3 Lbs� gives the genre a slightly new twist, focusing not on general medical conditions but on neurosurgery. The program�s name is a reference to the human brain, which by most estimates weighs approximately 3 Lbs pounds.

Stanley Tucci headlines the cast starring as Dr. Douglas Hanson, a renowned neurosurgeon with a sour attitude and stoic relationship with his patients. To his credit, however, these personality flaws are beyond his control: Hanson suffers from a brain defect that results in bravado, curtness and occasionally hallucinations.

Hanson�s bitterness is counterbalanced by his sweet prot�g�, Dr. Jonathan Seger (Mark Feuerstein), an upbeat and compassionate rookie surgeon who meditates before each operation. Seger finds himself frequently attempting to calm his mentor, suggesting various approaches that will ultimately tame Hanson�s brutal honesty, which at times borders on arrogance. He also takes a more humanistic approach to his profession, viewing the brain as a mystical object; Hanson on the other hand merely views the mind as �wires in a box.�

Of course no hospital drama would be complete without sexual tension. �3 Lbs� provides this component via the charming Indira Varma, who portrays neurologist Dr. Adrienne Holland. In the first episode Holland reveals her attraction to Seger, though her flirtation is seemingly thwarted when he mentions his girlfriend, who is about to relocate from Los Angeles to New York. Predictably, however, that will not tame Holland�s passion and viewers should expect an intimate affair to unravel.

Throughout the season the trio face a myriad of problems. In the series� premiere Hanson must treat a teen afflicted with a brain tumor, whose mother is frightful of her undergoing the necessary surgery. Future scenarios include a pregnant woman with a brain tumor, whose best option for treatment is chemotherapy, which could subsequently cause birth defects. Later we meet a soldier with a paralyzed left arm, that he is convinced belongs to another fallen comrade. We also see Hanson try to treat a clinically depressed man who fails to react to medicinal remedies; if he succeeds the surgery will be a pioneering accomplishment, though failure could result in tragedy.

As a testimony to �3 Lbs�� quality, its pilot episode attracted the attention of Dylan McDermott of �The Practice� and Reiko Aylesworth of �24�, who starred as Hanson and Holland. David Hinckley of the New York Daily News commented that, �After one hour, we not only care about the patients � but care quite a bit about the doctors.� Similarly positive, the New York Times� Alessandra Stanley dismisses the program�s derivative nature by stating, �The question is not whether 3 Lbs is familiar and predictable, but whether 3 Lbs is entertaining. It is, and mostly because it is so familiar and predictable.�