• Publication date: April 30, 2009

They Lost Their Father, Mother, and then Each Other Two Cubs Struggle to Survive Captivity

French filmmaker Jean-Jacques Annaud, creator of 1988�s �The Bear� delivers viewers another wildlife action, adventure, and drama entitled �Two Brothers� (2004). The film follows the lives of two tigers separated in their youth as they struggle to regain their freedom and reunite, not only with themselves, but also with their long lost mother. Annaud utilized approximately 30 different tigers to depict the parts of the two leading characters; additionally, CGI graphics were employed for stunts that could possibly endanger the animals or that they could not be trained to perform. Beautiful scenery is spread throughout the picture, including the tigers themselves, who the audience begins to sympathize with as if they are humans. It is a heartwarming adventure that youth will adore and grown ups can enjoy too.

French filmmaker Jean-Jacques Annaud, creator of 1988�s �The Bear� delivers viewers another wildlife action, adventure, and drama entitled �Two Brothers� (2004). The film follows the lives of two tigers separated in their youth as they struggle to regain their freedom and reunite, not only with themselves, but also with their long lost mother. Annaud utilized approximately 30 different tigers to depict the parts of the two leading characters; additionally, CGI graphics were employed for stunts that could possibly endanger the animals or that they could not be trained to perform. Beautiful scenery is spread throughout the picture, including the tigers themselves, who the audience begins to sympathize with as if they are humans. It is a heartwarming adventure that youth will adore and grown ups can enjoy too.

�Two Brothers� begins in the 1930s; the setting is French Indochina where Kumal and Sangha frolic in the wilderness. An ancient abandoned temple is their home, until Aidan McRory (Guy Pearce) disturbs the cubs while scavenging the area for rare artifacts. McRory has observed that Asian collectables have been fetching extremely high bids at recent auctions, and he hopes to cash in on the phenomenon.

However McRory is unaware that he has entered the tigers� domain and in alarm begins firing at the animals, killing the cubs� father. While Sangha and his mother escape from McRory, Kumal tries in vain to keep pace; when he falls behind the looter captures the lonely cub. Despite their unfriendly encounter, McRory expresses a liking to Kumal and keeps him. Their friendship is interrupted when Kumal�s capturer is arrested and hauled back to the village where he resides; the police chief takes the cub away from McRory and sells him to a circus where he is beaten into obedience and forced to perform.

Once McRory is released from custody he resumes his illegal quests. Along the way he almost manages to capture Sangha and his mother but fails, presumably fatally wounding the tigress as the young cub flees. Later, a young boy named Raoul discovers Sangha; Raoul and his family welcome Sangha with open arms, but are forced to part with him after he accidentally injures the family dog. Unfortunately, the cub winds up in the possession of an ignorant prince who wants Sangha to duel another cub to death.

Though none of the cubs speak throughout their journeys, Annaud cleverly creates a lens through which the audience can feel the emotion and tragedy of the animals. Is it possible that these animals can escape the grip of their cruel keepers and return to freedom? Or are they destined to live in sadness and solitude?

�Two Brothers� is rated PG for mild violence. Its runtime is 109 minutes.