• Publication date: March 20, 2013

Thirteen Days

Unfolding from the viewpoint of Kennedy brothers’ political consigliere, Kenneth O’Donnell, the film is an attempt at a docudrama of the 13 days of the Cuban missile crisis that began in October of 1962 when JFK was shown surveillance photos that Soviets were placing nuclear weapons in Cuba. The film used the transcripts of EXCOMM’s deliberations as the basis for its script.

Program data

Duration: 150

Production Year: 2000

MBC Max:

March 28, 2013 04:00 (KSA) ~ March 28, 2013 03:00 (CLT)

One of the most perilous moments of the world’s history, as the then two Superpowers came dangerously close to almost destroying mankind. As then Secretary of State Dean Rusk (played by Henry Strozier) says, "We're eyeball to eyeball and I think the other fellow just blinked"- meaning JFK and Khrushchev. That’s how close the world was to complete annihilation.

Unfolding from the viewpoint of Kennedy brothers’ political consigliere, Kenneth O’Donnell (played by Kevin Costner), the film is an attempt at a docudrama of the 13 days of the Cuban missile crisis that began in October of 1962 when JFK (Bruce Greenwood) was shown surveillance photos that Soviets were placing nuclear weapons in Cuba- literally, in America’s backyard. The film used the transcripts of EXCOMM’s deliberations as the basis for its script. Krushev’s promise of resolving the ‘Berlin Issue’ before the end of 1962, is highlighted as more of a point-of-departure than any U.S. dissatisfaction with Fidel Castro and his rule of Cuba. Beginning with a ‘quarantine’ of ships coming into Cuba- a step short of a blockade, which could be perceived as an instigator act of war- ships bound for the island were searched for weapons, as a clear sign that the placing of the Soviet missiles was not in the least acceptable. What rings true through the movie is the underrated performance of Bruce Greenwood who portrays the harrowing decisions and unbelievable weight of the situation at hand…

 

Starring:

  • Kevin Costner
  • Bruce Greenwood
  • Steven Culp
  • Kevin Conway
  • Dylan Baker
  • Michael Fairman
  • Walter Adrian
  • Henry Strozier
  • Boris Lee Krutonog

Directed by:  Roger Donaldson

Rating:  PG-13 for brief strong language.