• Publication date: January 22, 2010

Father, Husband, And Ruthless Dictator A View Inside The Life Of Russia�s Man Of Steel

Academy and Emmy Award winner Robert Duvall depicts the life of Soviet Leader Joseph Stalin in the aptly titled 1992 film �Stalin.� Though never officially released in theaters, and produced solely for cable broadcast, the picture earned significant amounts of media praise including both Emmy and Golden Globe nominations.

Academy and Emmy Award winner Robert Duvall depicts the life of Soviet Leader Joseph Stalin in the aptly titled 1992 film �Stalin.� Though never officially released in theaters, and produced solely for cable broadcast, the picture earned significant amounts of media praise including both Emmy and Golden Globe nominations. Duvall, is a seasoned actor with a resume of critically acclaimed work spanning nearly six decades; some of his most memorable films include 1962�s �To Kill a Mockingbird,� �The Godfather� (1972), and �Apocalypse Now� (1979).

Joseph Stalin was both a Russian statesman and general secretary of the Soviet Union�s Communist Party from 1922 until 1953. He is best known for his five year-plans of expedited industrialization and the nationalization of the country�s farms. More so, perhaps he is remembered for assassinating his intellectual foes, specifically those who could potentially harm his goals both politically and socially; these killings could sometimes include select opponents, or groups of individuals expressing dissent.

Duvall�s depiction of the leader does more than recreate Stalin�s life and politics, but provides a view into his family dealings, and more importantly his spirit. Born Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili, he adopted the name Stalin during his early days as a journalist, the Russian word for steel that would subsequently lead to his nickname �The Man of Steel.� No doubt, Duvall is able to convey Stalin�s rigidity ranging from a convincing Russian accent barking out unquestionable orders, to his psychologically daunting paranoia and mistrust of others, which often results in completely emotionless killings.

The film also includes an aging Lenin, portrayed by Maximilian Schell. In contrast to the film�s primary subject Lenin is warm, welcoming, and thoughtful; it is insinuated that after experiencing a number of strokes that Lenin was more easily swayed and less aware of his successor�s potential danger.

�Stalin� has a runtime of 166 minutes.